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Don't Eat Cat door Jess Walter
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Don't Eat Cat (editie 2012)

door Jess Walter

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455459,319 (3.16)Geen
In this brilliantly entertaining send-up of zombie lit, Edgar Award winner and National Book Award finalist Jess Walter offers a twist on America's favorite monster: You don't have to be dead to be a zombie. Walter creates a postapocalyptic nightmare that is as sidesplitting as it is moving—and all the more damning because it's so recognizable. Set in the year 2040, amid rolling epidemics, economic collapses, ozone tumors, genetic piracy, and an Arizona border war, "Don't Eat Cat" is the story of Owen, a guy who just wants to forget the results of his recent full-body scan with a grande soy latte before going to work in Seattle's food/finance district. The world has gone straight to hell, and the most horrifying part of it is that not a damn thing has changed: You still have to go to work, you still don't have a girlfriend, and, unbelievably, the line at the Starbucks Financial still stretches on forever. Why? Because there's a zombie working behind the counter, an addict of a club drug that causes its users to become aggressive, milk-pale, dead-eyed dimwits with an appetite for rodents and house pets—cats in particular (and, in very, very rare cases, humans). When Owen finally makes it to the head of the line, the afflicted barista's people skills falter under pressure and he mauls the store manager. It's the first documented zombie attack in months, and it sets the sim-tweets buzzing, ultimately ending in a vigilante killing. As for Owen, he gets more than a free latte out of the incident: He's forced to confront the brokenness of his present life by venturing into the past. With the help of a private investigator, he heads into Seattle's Zombie Town to search for the only woman he has ever loved. In "Don't Eat Cat," some highs are better than a lifetime of being human.… (meer)
Lid:highstrungsupernerd
Titel:Don't Eat Cat
Auteurs:Jess Walter
Info:Byliner Fiction
Verzamelingen:Jouw bibliotheek, Digital / iBooks
Waardering:
Trefwoorden:Geen

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Don't Eat Cat door Jess Walter

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Toon 5 van 5

"Don't Eat Cat," currently available on iBooks and Kindle, is just amazing and made me go in search of other fiction (non-zombie fiction) by Jess Walter, all of which (so far) is just as good.

In "Don't Eat Cat" zombies are a metaphor for drug addicts more than anything else and they only can function in a way that gives new meaning to "low level entry job."

Zombies or not, though, the writing is where it's at. One of my favorite lines goes something like this: "But THIS is the Apocalypse? F**k you! It's ALWAYS the Apocalypse. The world hasn't gone to sh*t. The world IS sh*t." Not exactly eloquent or elegant, true, but this quote sums up why I think I like apocalyptic fiction (with or without the living dead) so much.

The way our world is (at times) can feel so barren and bleak (for everyone, I'm pretty sure) but No Matter how bad it may get, we know we're alive because we find ourselves stronger and more determined to survive than we ever thought possible.

In so much of the apocalyptic novels I've read the people who most want to survive are the ones with the least amount to live for...ironic, but kind of true? ( )
  booksandcats4ever | Jul 30, 2018 |
This short story has been sitting on my Kindle forever. I can't even remember how I came across it. I needed a break from STEELHEART, so I dug through my library. Boy am I glad I did.

DON'T EAT CAT is surprisingly deep. It starts off hilariously, and I thought I had picked up a comedy. I rarely laugh out loud while reading (movies, yeah; books, not so much) but I cackled a good dozen times at this one. I guess I gel with the author's sense of humor.

I don't know if the story would be ruined by telling you what it's about, but it might be, so I'll only say this: It's an emotional rollercoaster ride. It starts off pedal-to-the-metal funny, then decelerates, becoming introspective, until finally it crashes head-first into icy waters, and we're plunged head first into soul-crushing sadness. It's hard to find a novel with range like this, much less a short story.

Most of you know I love sentences that describe things beautifully with simple language. Check this out: "His voice was ice in a blender." I got goose bumps. The author didn't have to say anything else. With that line I could hear the person in question perfectly; I could even see them quite clearly. That's why I read. Shit, that's why I write.

If you like passionate writing that isn't pretentious, I highly recommend this book. Hell, I almost want to buy it for you. I especially suggest this one to new authors. Jess Walter knows how to build his characters without exposition.

I will most certainly be looking for more from this author. ( )
  Edward.Lorn | Feb 13, 2015 |
Synopsis/blurb….

In this brilliantly entertaining send-up of zombie lit, Edgar Award winner and National Book Award finalist Jess Walter offers a twist on America’s favorite monster: You don’t have to be dead to be a zombie. Walter creates a postapocalyptic nightmare that is as sidesplitting as it is moving—and all the more damning because it’s so recognizable.

Set in the year 2040, amid rolling epidemics, economic collapses, ozone tumors, genetic piracy, and an Arizona border war, “Don’t Eat Cat” is the story of Owen, a guy who just wants to forget the results of his recent full-body scan with a grande soy latte before going to work in Seattle’s food/finance district. The world has gone straight to hell, and the most horrifying part of it is that not a damn thing has changed: You still have to go to work, you still don’t have a girlfriend, and, unbelievably, the line at the Starbucks Financial still stretches on forever. Why? Because there’s a zombie working behind the counter, an addict of a club drug that causes its users to become aggressive, milk-pale, dead-eyed dimwits with an appetite for rodents and house pets—cats in particular (and, in very, very rare cases, humans).

When Owen finally makes it to the head of the line, the afflicted barista’s people skills falter under pressure and he mauls the store manager. It’s the first documented zombie attack in months, and it sets the sim-tweets buzzing, ultimately ending in a vigilante killing. As for Owen, he gets more than a free latte out of the incident: He’s forced to confront the brokenness of his present life by venturing into the past. With the help of a private investigator, he heads into Seattle’s Zombie Town to search

In “Don’t Eat Cat,” some highs are better than a lifetime of being human.
-----------------
My take.......

Jess Walter is one of my favourite authors, a position I have adopted on the strength of having read two of his 6 novels thus far. On the stacks still are The Zero, Over Tumbled Graves, Land of the Blind and The Financial Lives of the Poets, as well as his collection of short stories – We Live in Water.

So I had fairly high expectations approaching this 30-odd page novella.

Plus points – it was short and cheap and it notched up another score on the reading tally for the year. And in my OCD completist world it has ticked off another Walter title, adding to the couple I have previously read and enjoyed – Citizen Vince (5 star – but pre-blogging days) and Beautiful Ruins (4 star review – http://col2910.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09...). It would always have slightly niggled me knowing it was there and I hadn’t read it.

Enjoyable? Not especially. I hadn’t done my homework before purchasing this cheap kindle single. Not a fan of futuristic tales and not a fan of zombies or zombie tales, so a short lesson learned in that author name, even an author who you hold in the highest esteem, isn’t always everything.

I read until the end, I followed it, I didn’t get lost, I didn’t switch off and daydream, I didn’t want to be doing anything other than reading it. It made sense. I just didn’t particularly enjoy it.

Jess Walter’s website is here -http://www.jesswalter.com/ . I’m looking forward to reading something longer from him in the next year or so. Still a favourite!

3 from 5

Purchased earlier this year or late last year on Amazon for kindle.

http://col2910.blogspot.co.uk/ ( )
  col2910 | Nov 12, 2014 |
You know there's a genuine labor shortage when the government resorts to allowing zombies employment at Starbucks. Funny short story that is worth the .99 cent download. ( )
  mr_nihilism | Apr 8, 2013 |
Don´t read book. Even though it´s pretty short, it´s a waste of time. A few funny ideas and a different view on Zombies doesn´t make a good reading. So far the worst piece of fiction I read this year ... ( )
  Ragle | Mar 29, 2013 |
Toon 5 van 5
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In this brilliantly entertaining send-up of zombie lit, Edgar Award winner and National Book Award finalist Jess Walter offers a twist on America's favorite monster: You don't have to be dead to be a zombie. Walter creates a postapocalyptic nightmare that is as sidesplitting as it is moving—and all the more damning because it's so recognizable. Set in the year 2040, amid rolling epidemics, economic collapses, ozone tumors, genetic piracy, and an Arizona border war, "Don't Eat Cat" is the story of Owen, a guy who just wants to forget the results of his recent full-body scan with a grande soy latte before going to work in Seattle's food/finance district. The world has gone straight to hell, and the most horrifying part of it is that not a damn thing has changed: You still have to go to work, you still don't have a girlfriend, and, unbelievably, the line at the Starbucks Financial still stretches on forever. Why? Because there's a zombie working behind the counter, an addict of a club drug that causes its users to become aggressive, milk-pale, dead-eyed dimwits with an appetite for rodents and house pets—cats in particular (and, in very, very rare cases, humans). When Owen finally makes it to the head of the line, the afflicted barista's people skills falter under pressure and he mauls the store manager. It's the first documented zombie attack in months, and it sets the sim-tweets buzzing, ultimately ending in a vigilante killing. As for Owen, he gets more than a free latte out of the incident: He's forced to confront the brokenness of his present life by venturing into the past. With the help of a private investigator, he heads into Seattle's Zombie Town to search for the only woman he has ever loved. In "Don't Eat Cat," some highs are better than a lifetime of being human.

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