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A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition door…
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A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition (editie 2009)

door Ernest Hemingway (Auteur), Sean Hemingway (Introductie), Patrick Hemingway (Voorwoord)

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Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway's most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent portraits of other expatriate luminaries such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; tender memories of his first wife, Hadley; and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft. It is a literary feast, brilliantly evoking the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the youthful spirit, unbridled creativity, and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.… (meer)
Lid:TJ0513
Titel:A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition
Auteurs:Ernest Hemingway (Auteur)
Andere auteurs:Sean Hemingway (Introductie), Patrick Hemingway (Voorwoord)
Info:Scribner (2009), 256 pages
Verzamelingen:Gelezen, maar niet in bezit
Waardering:**1/2
Trefwoorden:Geen

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A Moveable Feast. The Restored Edition door Ernest Hemingway

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1-5 van 36 worden getoond (volgende | toon alle)
I am a huge Hemingway fan, and i had never read this book before now, I am glad I got to it now. This book of essays is about Hemingway's early life in Paris before he wrote the The Sun Also Rises. He was married to Hadley and he had a young son. In this book of memoirs we see a young Hemingway struggling after he gave up journalism to take up a writing career. He started by writing short stories which he sold to various papers and magazines. At 25 he didn't think he could write a book, but write one he eventually did. Hemingway stuck to a strict working schedule all of his life. While he was living In Paris, most of his short stories were created at a neighbourhood cafe. We see Paris in the early 20th century through Hemingway's eyes. It was a city full of ex-pats. It was a city full of artists, authors, and musicians. It was a city full of ex-pats from all over the world, but especially from America whee Hemingway was from. We get a first-hand look at big names like Picasso, Gertrude Stein, and F. Scott Fitzgerald and Zelda. It was a world of parties and horse races. It was a world within a world. The City of Light was a magic place in the early 1920's. Hemingway describes it and distills it all in his wonderful language and sense of place. I loved the book, and loved the intimate look at his life at this time, with his wonderful wife Hadley. In this book we only see a hint of the brooding, sad and hopeless Hemingway that we know he becomes later on in his life until his tragic end. The book is full of hope and expectation for the wonderful life that he knew was just there and just out of his reach. Highly recommend. ( )
  Romonko | Sep 24, 2021 |
Too bad that I didn't finish this in enough time to have it count towards my Literary Birthday book reads for 2016. I should have just DNFed it since it didn't do anything besides bore and annoy me in equal measure.

So this is a memoir by Ernest Hemingway, where he talks about writing and then shit talks everyone else. I think the only people that Hemingway could stand was his wife at the time and his son. And even then I have questions about that since he mentions how their cat used to Bumby (that was what he nicknamed his son I am guessing) sit and they would leave him alone to be cat-watched. I wish I was kidding here.

Hemingway seemed to be jealous and annoyed by all that came near him. He seems to have some weird falling out with Gertrude Stein and I don't know if it's because she was calling someone "pussy" in an affectionate tones, or maybe he disapproved of her being gay. He has some really weird asides about homosexuality in this book and apparently thinks that men were just looking to assault one another so you had to be on your guard against those type of people. I just don't know.

This book had no flow to it at all. It also read very sterile to me except it would come alive when he would be talking about his dislike of women, Zelda Fitzgerald and Stein.

"Under questioning I tried to tell Miss Stein that when you were a boy
and moved in the company of men, you had to be prepared to kill a man, know how to do it and really know that you would do it in order to not be interfered with."

"There is not much future in men being friends with great women although it can be pleasant enough before it gets better or worse, and there is usually even less future with truly ambitious women writers."

Seriously though, most of this book seemed to be about his relationship with F. Scott Fitzgerald. There is jealousy here and there about how well he could write, and it seemed that Hemingway liked to show that Scott (as he called him) could not take his drink and was a bit of a hypochondriac. There is even an embarrassing scene where Scott tells him that his wife Zelda has said that he is not normal (length wise) and Hemingway tells him average is okay and let us go and look at some statues. I actually put the book aside for a second because I was hoping this was just a joke.

The memoir eventually peters out and we are provided early drafts of the beginning, and fragments of stories. ( )
  ObsidianBlue | Jul 1, 2020 |
It was recommended to me by an online writer’s masterclass I attended in January 2020. I need to add that I have never read any of Mr Hemingway’s books though I know him through the many quotes that frequent the writer’s world. I have learned to have respect for what he had achieved and the legacy he had left behind. So, I went in with great expectation but… there is always a but, correct.

My expectation quickly turned to confusion. Since I had done the writer’s masterclass in January, I cannot remember why it was recommended. It could be that we talked about memoirs and how to write it…

Maybe it has to do with the time difference, though I love a beautifully written historical. So, it cannot be the reason. On the plus side, Paris became alive through his telling and though he considered himself poor his life was not poor. Just imagine sitting at a café while you enjoy a glass of wine with equally skilled writers and poets; it would be a dream come true. Today we don’t have the privilege to mix with other writers like he did.

With that said, here are the things I didn’t like.

Too clunky, too many sticky words and too long sentences. Writing from then to now definitely had changed.

Then all the throat clearing. Pages of dialogue-soaked throat-clearing that you skip just to get to what he tries to say. In the end, I stopped with the book and thought if he could write and become famous, I can as well.

Did my respect for the older writers diminish? No, it didn’t. If not for them we would not have the writer’s community, we have today. They laid the foundation for us and for that they deserve our admiration.

The book will leave you with a mixture of admiration, awe, and confusion but it is still worth the time. Even if just for what you can learn from it. ( )
  lynelle.clark.5 | Jun 23, 2020 |
Published in 1964 after Ernest Hemingway's death, “A Moveable Feast” is itself something of a movable feast. Just as Easter, a movable feast, skips around on the calendar from one year to the next, so this book doesn't stay put. The copy I purchased at Hemingway House in Key West a few years ago is called "the restored edition," supposedly put back the way Hemingway wanted it, except that Hemingway died before deciding what it should contain, or even if it was worth publishing at all.

The title, though a good one, wasn't his idea. Among the titles Hemingway had considered were “The Part Nobody Knows,” “To Hope and Write Well (The Paris Stories),” To Love and Write Well,” “To Write It True,” “How It Began” and “How Different It Was When You Were There.” The restored edition includes 19 chapters, plus 10 other Paris "sketches," many of which had clearly been omitted previously for good reason.

In this book, even the truth is something of a movable feast. Although generally regarded as a memoir of his experiences in Paris in the 1920s, Hemingway himself called it fiction, and often it reads like his fiction. When he quotes other people, they all talk like characters in his novels.

Various people have had a hand in shaping “A Moveable Feast” over the years. His last wife, Mary, put the original book together, which may have been a challenge since much of it is about his first wife, Hadley. Later Hemingway's sons had input into its contents. A son (Patrick) writes the foreword for this edition, and a grandson (Sean) writes the introduction.

Hemingway may be at his best in these essays (or stories or sketches or whatever they are) when speaking about writers and writing. Best of all are his pieces on F. Scott Fitzgerald, especially one about the two of them going by train to Lyon to pick up a car and drive it back to Paris. It is a comic tale, fueled by Fitzgerald's hypochondria, his inability to hold his liquor and the fact that the car lacks a top and it rains frequently on the drive home. Elsewhere Fitzgerald is portrayed as a sadder figure because of his drinking, his difficulty in writing and Zelda's (his wife) jealousy whenever he attempts to write rather than spend time drinking with her.

Comments about Gertrude Stein, Ford Madox Ford and Ezra Pound are also fine, as is his short piece on Sylvia Beach, owner of Shakespeare and Company bookstore in Paris (not the same one that exists today along the Seine). At one point Hemingway refers to Pound as a saint, interesting because the poet later moved to Italy and supported the fascists.

There is much to like in “A Moveable Feast,” as well as much that will make one wonder why it was ever included. ( )
  hardlyhardy | Jun 22, 2020 |
I had to read The Old Man and the Sea in college. I did not like it. Found it dry as a bone. Some of Hemingway's stories were not as bad, but I would never consider myself a fan.

Having read A Moveable Feast, though, I find myself moved more toward neutrality than dislike. I recognized many lines throughout, having encountered them as inspirational quotes for writers in one place or another. Further more, I respected him for his ability to compartmentalize his own life--looking at his early time in Paris, his young adulthood, within the context of the time period rather than with the full weight of age and bitterness. This is especially true of how he writes about his first wife, Hadley, who he betrays with the woman who will become his second wife. He also paints a vivid portrait of F. Scott Fitzgerald and his wife Zelda--not a flattering portrait, but one that feels complex and honest (note to self: never, ever take a trip with the Fitzgeralds).

The way he writes about Paris in the early 1920s is absolutely mesmerizing. This cosmopolitan city of incredible gardens, museums, and diverse cafes, where in the morning goats are still herded through the streets, with milk fresh from the source to those who pay.

My edition of the book had an informative intro that explained changes that Hemingway's last wife made to the first edition of this book, published after his death, and appended material at the end includes unfinished chapters and a fascinating couple pages of drafts of the starting paragraphs of the book. ( )
  ladycato | Feb 3, 2020 |
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Foreword by Patrick Hemingway: A new generation of Hemingway readers (one hopes there will never be a lost generation!) has the opportunity here to read a pblished text that is a less edited and more comprehensive version of the original manuscript material the author intended as a memoir of his young, formative years as a writer in Paris; one of his best moveable feasts. . . .
Introduction by Sean Hemingway: In November 1956, the management of the Ritz Hotel in Paris convinced Ernest Hemingway to repossess two small steamer trunks that he had stored there in March 1928. . . .
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Do not combine The Restored Edition with the 1964 edition of A Moveable Feast. The Restored Edition includes additional chapters, e.g., “A Strange Fight Club", “The Education of Mr. Bumby”, “Scott and His Parisian Chauffeur,” and “Secret Pleasures.”
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Wikipedia in het Engels (1)

Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway's most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent portraits of other expatriate luminaries such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; tender memories of his first wife, Hadley; and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft. It is a literary feast, brilliantly evoking the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the youthful spirit, unbridled creativity, and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.

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