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The Rabbi's Atheist Daughter: Ernestine Rose, International Feminist…

door Bonnie S. Anderson

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1631,007,673 (3.5)Geen
"Early feminist Ernestine Rose, more famous in her time than Elizabeth Cady Stanton or Susan B. Anthony, has been undeservedly forgotten. During the 1850s, Rose was an outstanding orator for women's rights in the United States who became known as "the Queen of the platform." Yet despite her successes and close friendships with other activists, she would gradually be erased from history for being a foreigner, a radical, and, of most concern to her peers and later historians, an atheist. In The Rabbi's Atheist Daughter, Bonnie S. Anderson recovers the legacy of one of the nineteenth century's most prominent radical activists. The only child of a Polish rabbi, Ernestine Rose rejected religion at an early age, legally fought a betrothal to a man she did not want to marry, and left her family, Judaism, and Poland forever. She would eventually move to London, where she became a follower of the manufacturer-turned-socialist Robert Owen and met her husband, fellow Owenite William Rose. Together they emigrated to New York City in 1836. In the U. S., Rose was a prominent leader at every national women's rights convention, lecturing across the country in favor of feminism and against slavery and religion. But the rise of anti-Semitism and religious fervor during the Civil War-coupled with rifts in the women's movement when black men, but not women, got the vote- left Rose without a platform. Returning to England, she continued advocating for feminism, free thought, and pacifism. Although many radicals honored her work, her contributions to women's rights had been passed over by historians by the 1920s. Nearly a century later, The Rabbi's Atheist Daughter, a well-rounded portrait of one of the mothers of the American feminist movement, returns Ernestine Rose to her rightful place"--… (meer)

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The dominance in the public imagination of Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucretia Mott as the preeminent figures of the 19th century women's suffrage movement in the United States often obscures the role played by many other women in advancing the cause of women's rights during that era. One of them was Ernestine Rose, an immigrant from Poland by way of Great Britain who as a writer and platform speaker campaigned for many of the leading reform causes of the mid-19th century. Yet this was just one stage in a long career that straddled the Atlantic, reflecting many of the common issues that activists fought for in Europe as well as America.

Bonnie Anderson's book provides readers with a brisk account of Rose's career and achievements. In it, she recounts Rose's life from her upbringing in Poland, where her father's commitment to educating her led her to question and ultimately renounce her Jewish faith. As a young woman in England she embraced the teachings of the English reformer Robert Owen, her involvement with whom led her to emigrate to the United States in 1836. From her home in New York City Rose traversed the country advocating for such cases as free thought and abolition, though it was her advocacy of women's rights for which she became best known. While her efforts to end slavery were achieved with the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, the subsequent fracturing of the women's rights movement in the U.S. led Rose and her husband to return to Britain, where continued her campaigns for women's suffrage to the end of her life.

By detailing the range of Rose's interests and efforts, Anderson restores Rose to her proper place in the story of the women's rights movement. While constrained by the paucity of sources about Rose's early life, she draws conclusions from the context of her times to fill in several of the gaps, helping to underscore the remarkable nature of Rose's achievements in the process. The result is an account of Rose's life that gives her the credit she deserves for her tireless efforts on behalf of the causes which she held so dear. ( )
  MacDad | Mar 27, 2020 |
Lesser known abolitionist and suffragette, but equally important as Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. ( )
  JoanDudzinski | Aug 2, 2018 |
A look at one of the most famous people you probably never heard of - unless you are involved in feminsm and/or freethought, since there are people in both those movements that keep her name around. She was one of the biggest movers and shakers, inspiring such people as Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and was said to be the only foreign born woman speaking for feminism in the US in the mid-19th century. Her life is a bit sketchy, as she did not keep detailed records, but she did write long letters and give speeches, some of which still survive. She also wrote frequent letters to newspapers that are still around in the archives, so it is not impossible to put together a life story. The author writes with candid, lucid prose about an interesting subject. The biggest downside is her frequent use of "condescending" to describe things Rose was saying or doing; she quoted many of these, and they did not sound of themselves condescending; tone would make the difference, but that has not survived. It grates, because it has the stench of that popular favorite "uppity", and the use of it has a distinct anti-intellectual sound that is not fitting in a biography of a woman noted for her extreme intellect. Other than that, well worth the read. ( )
  Devil_llama | Nov 1, 2017 |
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"Early feminist Ernestine Rose, more famous in her time than Elizabeth Cady Stanton or Susan B. Anthony, has been undeservedly forgotten. During the 1850s, Rose was an outstanding orator for women's rights in the United States who became known as "the Queen of the platform." Yet despite her successes and close friendships with other activists, she would gradually be erased from history for being a foreigner, a radical, and, of most concern to her peers and later historians, an atheist. In The Rabbi's Atheist Daughter, Bonnie S. Anderson recovers the legacy of one of the nineteenth century's most prominent radical activists. The only child of a Polish rabbi, Ernestine Rose rejected religion at an early age, legally fought a betrothal to a man she did not want to marry, and left her family, Judaism, and Poland forever. She would eventually move to London, where she became a follower of the manufacturer-turned-socialist Robert Owen and met her husband, fellow Owenite William Rose. Together they emigrated to New York City in 1836. In the U. S., Rose was a prominent leader at every national women's rights convention, lecturing across the country in favor of feminism and against slavery and religion. But the rise of anti-Semitism and religious fervor during the Civil War-coupled with rifts in the women's movement when black men, but not women, got the vote- left Rose without a platform. Returning to England, she continued advocating for feminism, free thought, and pacifism. Although many radicals honored her work, her contributions to women's rights had been passed over by historians by the 1920s. Nearly a century later, The Rabbi's Atheist Daughter, a well-rounded portrait of one of the mothers of the American feminist movement, returns Ernestine Rose to her rightful place"--

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