StartGroepenDiscussieMeerTijdgeest
Doorzoek de site
Onze site gebruikt cookies om diensten te leveren, prestaties te verbeteren, voor analyse en (indien je niet ingelogd bent) voor advertenties. Door LibraryThing te gebruiken erken je dat je onze Servicevoorwaarden en Privacybeleid gelezen en begrepen hebt. Je gebruik van de site en diensten is onderhevig aan dit beleid en deze voorwaarden.
Hide this

Resultaten uit Google Boeken

Klik op een omslag om naar Google Boeken te gaan.

Svårt att vara gud : [roman] door Arkadij…
Bezig met laden...

Svårt att vara gud : [roman] (origineel 1964; editie 1975)

door Arkadij Natanovic Strugackij

LedenBesprekingenPopulariteitGemiddelde beoordelingAanhalingen
7142223,290 (3.77)27
Don Rumata has been sent from Earth to the medieval kingdom of Arkanar with instructions to observe and to save what he can. Masquerading as an arrogant nobleman, a dueler, and a brawler, he is never defeated, but yet he can never kill. With his doubt and compassion, and his deep love for a local girl named Kira, Rumata wants to save the kingdom from the machinations of Don Reba, the first minister to the king. But given his orders, what role can he play? This long overdue translation will reintroduce one of the most profound Soviet-era novels to an eager audience.… (meer)
Lid:larswave
Titel:Svårt att vara gud : [roman]
Auteurs:Arkadij Natanovic Strugackij
Info:Malmö: Bernce, 1975; 288 s.
Verzamelingen:Jouw bibliotheek
Waardering:
Trefwoorden:Geen

Werkdetails

Hard to be a god door Arkady Strugatsky (1964)

  1. 10
    Use of Weapons door Iain M. Banks (prezzey)
    prezzey: Banks seems to have been inspired by the Strugatskys' concept of Progressors. Similar theme, different perspective (Western vs Eastern bloc) - if you liked one, you will probably be interested in the other.
Bezig met laden...

Meld je aan bij LibraryThing om erachter te komen of je dit boek goed zult vinden.

Op dit moment geen Discussie gesprekken over dit boek.

» Zie ook 27 vermeldingen

Engels (18)  Frans (3)  Noors (1)  Alle talen (22)
1-5 van 22 worden getoond (volgende | toon alle)
My second book by the Strugatsky brothers, and while I didn't really love Roadside Picnic I felt it was good enough to try another before I decided whether to avoid them in future or not. I can safely say this will be my last.

Hard to be a God has a storyline that I really thought would interest me. An agent from an Earth set in the future travels back through time to another world to see how they are developing. He is not allowed to intervene (think Star Trek Prime Directive) no matter how much he may disagree or dislike what he sees around him. Can he continue to keep his origins a secret and not pollute the timeline?

Firstly the positives, I fully appreciate this was a book written under an Iron soviet rule and the plot is a veiled representation of the regime people had to live under. Therefore they were restricted in what they could write to get past the censors and also needed to make the criticisms fairly identifiable but without being too obvious. The plot idea was original for the time written and surely would have created an interest as the world starts to look to the skies and the unknown of space etc.

For some reason, and I fully appreciate I am in the minority as there are many reviews shouting the praises of Hard to be a God, I just hated it. I found the plot irregular, far too many characters and pages and pages of babble. This was one of the rare occasions when I could actually read a full page and be none the wiser about what I had just read. It literally bored me to tears. Confession time, I read around 2 thirds and then cast it aside, so maybe there was some sort of epiphany moment in the last 80 pages, but I will never find out, and if I am honest I pretty much doubt it. ( )
  Bridgey | Jan 21, 2021 |
The more I think about this book the better it gets.

It starts rather abruptly with a prologue that shows three youngsters wandering around a wilderness to no real purpose. The real function of this prologue isn't clear until the epilogue...

Then suddenly everyone has grown up and we're on a different planet which is remarkably like Earth (same ecology, humans live in a feudal society with mediaeval technology) a bizarre coincidence that is never addressed. We also learn that back home on Earth a genuinely Communist society has taken root globally and technology has advanced greatly - interstellar travel is practised, after all. The visitors from Earth are historical observers - they are supposed to be collecting data to support the prevaling theory of history which dictates that there is only one eventual result of human history - the Communist State of course. But things seem to be going wrong - an alarming individual, a minister to the King, seems to be trying to eliminate all centres of learning and all literate individuals. Is it a bid to establish a Totalitarian State? That shouldn't happen according to the accepted theory of history.

The observers from Earth are not supposed to interfere, but it's hard to be a god and remain aloof when surrounded by misery, disease, ignorance, brutality and persecution. What's the right thing to do?

It's a thematically complex novel that nevertheless could be read by a young person simply as a kind of adventure tale. Unsurprisingly many of the themes are political; censorship and suppression of learning, Totalitarianism and will to power, Communist theory, religious oppression, but some are as much ethical: is interference in an attempt to improve the lot of the masses justified or not? And (perhaps the most interesting and unexpected to me) if you take a person from an ideal society, Utopian, safe, stable, moral, with fair and equal distribution of resources and put him in the antithetical situation, largely isolated from his peers, what happens? Does he maintain the moral code of home, or does the society around him eventually corrupt him? What exactly happens at the end is left a little ambiguous but the implication is clear. The impact is made clear in the epilogue, back on Earth, with the three friends from the prologue re-united.

There's an afterword to this translation which appears to date back to 1997, by the surviving Strugatsky brother. It's as fascinating as the book itself, setting a context for its writing that is very illuminating. Initially a straight-forward SF adventure story in the vein of Dumas' Musketeers novels was the sole aim, but it was the early 1960s and the political situation in Russia inevitably reared its ugly head. A furore arose regarding whether the SF community's younger elements' satirical and critical attacks on the status quo of political oppression, ever changing approved political doctrine, hypocrisy were allowable. Older writers, government shills, were loudly complaining. The regime was visibly critical of much of the new art, visual, literary or even musical. Was there going to be a crack-down?

Well, the Strugatskies decided to risk it and turned their prospective piece of pure escapism into an attack on those in power, Communist theory, Totalitarianism in general and the will to power of individuals. The crack-down never came and the book was not treated severely by the censors, though their editor persuaded the authors to change the name of the villain from Rebia (anagram of Beria, a prominent politician of the time) to the marginally more subtle Reba.

The other thing the afterword establishes is that there was a thriving market for SF in Soviet era Russia, big enough to have a society specifically for SF authors, a fact that it would be hard to believe given only the evidence of what has been published in English translation. Another observation is that just as social and political concerns are frequently explored in English language SF, so they were in the Russian SF of that time, with the same somewhat reduced level of scrutiny by dismissive people in power. (Compare with Solzhenitsyn, who published One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich in 1962, the same year Hard to be a God was being written).

I'll certainly be looking for the other Strugatsky books with editions in English but I'm also interested in picking up any other Russian SF available in translation to further compare and contrast the trends and themes of Russian and Anglo-American SF. ( )
1 stem Arbieroo | Jul 17, 2020 |
Wonderful premise, which never really develops into anything worthwhile. The idea of the moral struggle of a powerful alien in a barbrous medieval hell is rich with possibilities, from the philosophical contradictions of 'the prime directive', to the wretched temptations and corruptions of visceral decadence. This isn't the book to flesh any of those out. Barely an allegory, merely the thinest examination of it's premise, constantly undermined by cheap drama, wish fulfillment and deus et machina. ( )
  GDiddy | May 5, 2020 |
This novel was really slow-starting, since there was a LOT of world-building. Most of the world-building was fun after you got over the initial confusion, however. I felt like it balanced itself out by the end, so I'm giving it 4 stars barring a re-read that changes my mind.

The novel centres on Don Rumata (or Anton), an undercover operative on a planet with mediaeval-level of technology from a future Earth. There's also mediaeval-level sanitation, so the authors spend quite a bit of time illustrating the innate disgust that a modern person would need to overcome were he or she actually a resident of a mediaeval town. And the psychological conditioning such a person would need just to be able to eat the food.

I'm not sure I buy the assumption of the inevitability of civilization that is presented, although I'm not certain that the arguments for it were sincere. They seemed to be countered by arguments against giving the god-like Earth technology to the mediaevals. Actually, in retrospect, I'm not sure whether Rumata's mission was to prove their historical theories or enforce them. He mostly spends his time rescuing intellectuals (when he's not maintaining his cover), and the bulk of the plot centres on rescuing a man called Budach whom other agents have mislaid. I'm just not sure what this achieves. [This is where a reread may help.]

I do like the description of Rumata as a god in human form, and not just because of his sword skills and battle tactics. A modern human would have so much broader of a perspective of the world that god-like seems apt. In fact, Anton as Rumata has to keep reminding himself that the people around him are human, or at least, will be human (since they are so petty and narrow-minded). It's a nice touch.

---
Update (2015-02-11): The reread didn't change my mind about the rating, although I was tempted to bump it up half a star. The reread also clarified things a lot from the beginning. I may even read it a third time, eventually. I do still feel that those two dialogues near the end are a bit of a weakness because the book relies on them so heavily, but they're also fun to read. ( )
1 stem natcontrary | May 21, 2018 |
Agents from a future Soviet Union are embedded on a planet with a medieval government as observers. They can produce infinite wealth and have access to high-tech equipment, but they are forbidden to intervene in the affairs of state. They can only watch helplessly as intrigues slide the state into barbarism. ( )
1 stem questbird | Dec 25, 2017 |
1-5 van 22 worden getoond (volgende | toon alle)
geen besprekingen | voeg een bespreking toe

» Andere auteurs toevoegen (11 mogelijk)

AuteursnaamRolType auteurWerk?Status
Arkady Strugatskyprimaire auteuralle editiesberekend
Strugatsky, Borisprimaire auteuralle editiesbevestigd
Aksionov, S.Cover photoSecondaire auteursommige editiesbevestigd
Bormashenko, OlenaVertalerSecondaire auteursommige editiesbevestigd
Buchner, HermannVertalerSecondaire auteursommige editiesbevestigd
Freas, KellyArtiest omslagafbeeldingSecondaire auteursommige editiesbevestigd
Kunzru, HariVoorwoordSecondaire auteursommige editiesbevestigd
Olson, SarahOmslagontwerperSecondaire auteursommige editiesbevestigd
Specht, ArnoVertalerSecondaire auteursommige editiesbevestigd
Strugatsky, BorisNawoordSecondaire auteursommige editiesbevestigd
Thole, C. A. M.Artiest omslagafbeeldingSecondaire auteursommige editiesbevestigd
Je moet ingelogd zijn om Algemene Kennis te mogen bewerken.
Voor meer hulp zie de helppagina Algemene Kennis .
Gangbare titel
Informatie afkomstig uit de Engelse Algemene Kennis. Bewerk om naar jouw taal over te brengen.
Oorspronkelijke titel
Alternatieve titels
Informatie afkomstig uit de Duitse Algemene Kennis. Bewerk om naar jouw taal over te brengen.
Oorspronkelijk jaar van uitgave
Mensen/Personages
Belangrijke plaatsen
Belangrijke gebeurtenissen
Verwante films
Prijzen en eretitels
Informatie afkomstig uit de Engelse Algemene Kennis. Bewerk om naar jouw taal over te brengen.
Motto
Informatie afkomstig uit de Engelse Algemene Kennis. Bewerk om naar jouw taal over te brengen.
The sorrow that tortured me, the shame that overwhelmed me, the desperation that wracked my mind, all these I could then feel, but even now I can find no words to express them.

-Peter Abalard
Now one thing I have to tell you. In this particular show you have to be armed to enforce your authority. But you're not to use your weapon under any circumstances. Under any circumstances. Is that quite clear?

-Ernest Hemingway
Opdracht
Eerste woorden
Citaten
Laatste woorden
Ontwarringsbericht
Uitgevers redacteuren
Auteur van flaptekst/aanprijzing
Informatie afkomstig uit de Engelse Algemene Kennis. Bewerk om naar jouw taal over te brengen.
Oorspronkelijke taal
Informatie afkomstig uit de Engelse Algemene Kennis. Bewerk om naar jouw taal over te brengen.
Gangbare DDC/MDS

Verwijzingen naar dit werk in externe bronnen.

Wikipedia in het Engels (1)

Don Rumata has been sent from Earth to the medieval kingdom of Arkanar with instructions to observe and to save what he can. Masquerading as an arrogant nobleman, a dueler, and a brawler, he is never defeated, but yet he can never kill. With his doubt and compassion, and his deep love for a local girl named Kira, Rumata wants to save the kingdom from the machinations of Don Reba, the first minister to the king. But given his orders, what role can he play? This long overdue translation will reintroduce one of the most profound Soviet-era novels to an eager audience.

Geen bibliotheekbeschrijvingen gevonden.

Boekbeschrijving
Haiku samenvatting

Snelkoppelingen

Populaire omslagen

Waardering

Gemiddelde: (3.77)
0.5
1 3
1.5 1
2 10
2.5 3
3 30
3.5 10
4 62
4.5 4
5 33

Ben jij dit?

Word een LibraryThing Auteur.

 

Over | Contact | LibraryThing.com | Privacy/Voorwaarden | Help/Veelgestelde vragen | Blog | Winkel | APIs | TinyCat | Nagelaten Bibliotheken | Vroege Recensenten | Algemene kennis | 156,958,262 boeken! | Bovenbalk: Altijd zichtbaar