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The Raven [poem]

door Edgar Allan Poe

Andere auteurs: Zie de sectie andere auteurs.

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1,717368,435 (4.19)54
How is this book unique? Font adjustments & biography included Unabridged (100% Original content) Illustrated About The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe "The Raven" is a narrative poem by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere. It tells of a talking raven's mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man's slow fall into madness. The lover, often identified as being a student, is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore. Sitting on a bust of Pallas, the raven seems to further instigate his distress with its constant repetition of the word "Nevermore". The poem makes use of a number of folk, mythological, religious, and classical references. Poe claimed to have written the poem very logically and methodically, intending to create a poem that would appeal to both critical and popular tastes, as he explained in his 1846 follow-up essay, "The Philosophy of Composition". The poem was inspired in part by a talking raven in the novel Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of 'Eighty by Charles Dickens. Poe borrows the complex rhythm and meter of Elizabeth Barrett's poem "Lady Geraldine's Courtship", and makes use of internal rhyme as well as alliteration throughout.… (meer)
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The Raven is a poem that can be appreciated on several levels, not the least of which is construction. One of the most perfectly constructed alliterative poems ever penned, who has not thrilled to "and the silken, sad, uncertain rustling of each purple curtain"? It trips off the tongue and at the same time it calls up a perfect image of a Gothic library with heavy curtains that should not, but do, rustle.

It is a study in loneliness, mourning, stress and madness. As the narrator tells us the tale of the raven's visit, he gradually degrades from someone who is attempting to find logical explanations for this event to someone who completely believes in the supernatural nature of the bird. He can no longer think rationally, because he asks repeated questions for which he hopes to get a positive answer but which can only get the one word response that the bird is able to give, "nevermore".

Whatever hope he may have had of recovering from the loss of his love or gaining some relief from his suffering, even in the next life, is vanquished by the repeated denials of the bird. His attempts to forget his loss and his love are seen as impossible. In the progress of the poem, we witness a man sink from loss to loss to hopelessness. In the end, he no longer clings to any remnant of his sanity. For him, the bird, "bird or devil", is something far more than an earthly creature, and it remains forever, just as his memory does, before his eyes, impossible to avoid. ( )
  mattorsara | Aug 11, 2022 |

( )
  ayoshina | Jul 31, 2022 |
Lovely poem. Beautiful illustrations.
This edition has a lot of stuff I don't really care about. But it's also FREE. ( )
  QuirkyCat_13 | Jun 20, 2022 |
Summary: Edgar Allan Poe's famous story of a man's reaction to a raven's calls as he thinks about his lost love.

Personal Reaction. From my experience this poem is really effective for kids, even if they do not necessarily understand everything. It has great rhythm and a memorable refrain. This edition is illustrated by Ryan Price. The illustrations are pretty scary, and frankly a bit disturbing. Perhaps fits the tone of the poem, but not what I would choose for most kids (or maybe that's just me!). ( )
  Ivan_Stoner | Feb 4, 2022 |
I read the Project Gutenberg edition of this famous poem. A great read anytime but most especially in October, with Halloween just around the corner.


edit*** reread 10-31-2019
relisten actually, The Raven read by Christopher Lee with onscreen text and background music. The music really reminds me of the background music from the movie The Crow, not sure if that is the source, but it added to the experience for me.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BefliMlEzZ8&t=9s ( )
  kevn57 | Dec 8, 2021 |
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» Andere auteurs toevoegen (24 mogelijk)

AuteursnaamRolType auteurWerk?Status
Poe, Edgar Allanprimaire auteuralle editiesbevestigd
Dooijes, DickIllustratorSecundaire auteursommige editiesbevestigd

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Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary, over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore...
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And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain thrilled me - filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before
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This is the entry for the single poem, "The Raven" (1845); it is not an entry for compilations of multiple works that include "The Raven" and have the title "The Raven".  Please do not combine!



Also, please note that the Common Knowledge field for "Original publication date" refers to the main work, the poem.  "The Raven" was first published in 1845.  If you wish to track particular illustrated editions (such as Gustav Doré), then they should be treated as separate editions. If you combine them, the CK information relates to the original work -- not particular illustrated editions.
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How is this book unique? Font adjustments & biography included Unabridged (100% Original content) Illustrated About The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe "The Raven" is a narrative poem by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere. It tells of a talking raven's mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man's slow fall into madness. The lover, often identified as being a student, is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore. Sitting on a bust of Pallas, the raven seems to further instigate his distress with its constant repetition of the word "Nevermore". The poem makes use of a number of folk, mythological, religious, and classical references. Poe claimed to have written the poem very logically and methodically, intending to create a poem that would appeal to both critical and popular tastes, as he explained in his 1846 follow-up essay, "The Philosophy of Composition". The poem was inspired in part by a talking raven in the novel Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of 'Eighty by Charles Dickens. Poe borrows the complex rhythm and meter of Elizabeth Barrett's poem "Lady Geraldine's Courtship", and makes use of internal rhyme as well as alliteration throughout.

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